Archive | Stone Setting

Gypsy Setting or Flush Setting Tutorial

Part 2 of the Tapered Rectangle Earring Tutorial

Let’s finish this earring project we started yesterday. When I left off, we created the design and cut the pilot hole for the stones we are going to Gypsy Set or Flush Set into the flat earrings, so let’s dive it:


These are the tools I am using to cut the seats and set the stones:  a 0.9mm Twist Drill Bit to drill the pilot hole, a 1.3mm Twist Drill Bit (65% of the stone size) a 1.8mm Bud Bur, and a 2.0mm Hart Setting Bur. All these tools are available at JewelryMonk.com/tools at a discounted price. Also a burnishing tool I will show you how to prepare later.

First I drilled the earrings with the 0.9mm Twist Drill Bit as a pilot hole, then finished it off with a 1.3mm Twist Drill Bit, which is 65% of the total stone size. I like to have my “Through Hole” for settings between 60%-70% of the stone size. After the hole is drilled, I prepare the setting with a 1.8mm Bud Bur, which is about 90% of the total stone width. This helps the stone to seat better. Some stones are cut with a thicker bottom, and this will help with stone variance.

The width or size of the stone is important to know, but also be aware of the thickness of the girdle of the stone, or the side area. This will determine how deep to drill your seat for the stone. This stone has a little thicker girdle, so I have to drill a little deeper than normal. I used a 2.0mm Hart Setting Bur to do this. You want to drill the stone seat so that there is a little metal between the top of the girdle and the top of the piece. You want the table (or top) of the stone to be at the same level as the surface of the metal.

Now that I have the stones ready to set, I will finish assembling the earrings. I mark the back of the pieces where I want the earring post to be attached. I mark them so they are the same from side to side. Just a small make is needed, which will be covered up by the head of the earring post and the solder. Next I clean the piece well and get ready to solder.

After the pieces are clean, I dip them into a mixture of Denatured Alcohol and Boric Acid Powder, this helps to prevent fire scale. I add just a little dot of Handy Flux to the area where the solder will go. I also add just a dot of flux to the head of the earring post and pick up a small piece of Medium Silver Solder (cut from a sheet). You can see not much is needed. Since the earring is thicker and heavier than the earring post, during soldering I focus the majority of the heat from the torch to this area. This prevents melting the post. I solder, then pickle to remove any fire scale and the left over glazed flux.

After getting the pieces out of the pickle, I bench polish the piece to take care of any small scratches or imperfections before setting the stones. I also want to polish the top and refine the beveled edge on this design, and the Hard Felt Wheel works great for this. I use a Knife Edge Hard Felt Wheel on the back, to get close to the post without bending it.

Another added feature I like to do is take my Hart Setting Bur and clean up the hole on the back side of the setting, This looks cleaner and more uniform when it is polished. I usually just put the bur in the hole and turn it with my fingers, (no foredom) It doesn’t take much to clean this out.

To support the earring during setting, I drilled a hole in my bench pin with a 1.0mm Twist Drill for the earring post to fit into. This keeps it from bending and helps to use the back of the earring as support during the setting process.

The burnishing tool I use to set the stone is one I made. I took an old dull ball bur, probably around 1.0mm and cut or broke off the end. I sanded the edge round with a Snap On Sanding Disc and polished it by rubbing it back and forth on a piece of paper loaded with Yellow Rouge. I use a small flat piece of glass or plexiglass under the paper, and rub the rough across the paper to prepare it, then keep rubbing the burnisher until it has a high shine.

FINALLY, it is time to set the stone! I place the polished burnisher at the intersection of the stone and metal and in a circular motion, with the burnisher at about a 10 degree angle, I mold the metal edge slightly over the edge of the stone. You will be surprised how little metal it takes to hold the stone in place.

To see this process, I have attached a Video of this setting process, it is about 7 minutes long, but goes into more detail about the setting process. Click the link below:

After the stone is set, I give it a light polish on my polishing machine, clean it in the ultrasonic, and it is all finished!

I truly hope this helps you to understand this process. Like most things, the more you practice, the more familiar and better you will get. At least you now know the “Mechanics” behind the art of Gypsy/Flush Setting.

Again, the majority of the tools used in this tutorial are available at a discounted price at JewelryMonk.com/tools

And remember, if you are not subscribed HERE, you might miss out on some really cool jewelry stuff.

Thanks for stopping by. Now…… Go Make Something Shiny!

Doug

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Tapered Rectangle Earring Tutorial

Tapered Rectangle Earring Tutorial

It has been a while since I actually sat down and did a project tutorial from start to finish. Well you are in luck. I have a project that I just finished, that I will cover in 2 posts. The first will be creating the earrings and getting them ready to set stones in them, the second part will be a tutorial on Gypsy, or Flush Setting, which will combine a step by step tutorial, AND a Video Tutorial, so let’s dive in:


The first thing I do here is select a piece of sheet silver that I made from an ingot a while back, I measured the sheet to make sure it was thick enough for the stones I want to set in them. The stone measurement from the table to the culet is 1.4mm, so the silver sheet I selected is 1.85mm, just to make sure the culet of the stone doesn’t protrude through the back of the piece and touch the ear.

 

Next I start to layout the design. I always want to start with a straight edge, so I use my JewelryMonk Jeweler’s Square to create this edge. I Scribe a line, then saw along the outside of this line. Next, I use my 2 Hand File to bring the edge up to the line.

Using my dividers, I scribe a parallel line the height of the design I want to create. I also scribe a 90-degree line on the side, from the top and bottom to help in the layout of the design.

I want my earring to be 6mm wide, so I scribe a line down the center of each piece at 3mm. I also leave 0.5mm in between the two pieces for my saw blade width and filing. I want a tapered rectangle look, so I measure out my shape and use my Jeweler’s Square to scribe the lines. I cut these out with my saw, and file up to the line.

Now I lay the stone where I want it in the design and scribe a center mark where I want the setting to be. I use an awl to mark a dimple and use a small ball bur (1.0mm) to start a pilot hole to drill from.

Next I will stamp the backside with a Sterling Stamp on my Steel Bench Block, because if I do it later, it will scratch and distort the piece a little. You can see the bottom got distorted a little, so I file the bottom edge flat again. I also rub the earrings on a piece of 600 Grit Sandpaper to make sure the front, back, and sides are smooth and flat.

I also want a little bevel to the top of the design, so I file and sand a beveled edge to the top edge. I use my # 4 Hand File and a Snap-On Sanding Disc to get this done. I finish up taking out the scratches with a Green Silicone Knife Edge Wheel. This takes out the finer scratches and leaves a smooth flat edge.

When working on flat pieces, I will take a piece of gray polishing compound and rub it on a thick piece of paper. I make sure the paper is on a flat area, then I rub the flat pieces across the compound-loaded paper with my finger in a circular motion. This leaves a very smooth and shiny surface.

Now the earrings are ready to set some stones in them. In the next post, I will drill the stone seats, solder an earring post on them, set the stones and polish.

The majority of the tools used in creating this earring are available at a discounted price at JewelryMonk.com/tools. Most are limited quantities, and will not last long.

Make sure you subscribe to JewelryMonk.com to stay updated on all the Jewelry Making goodness that goes on here.

Now as always, thanks for stopping by.

Now, Go make something Shiny!

Doug

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I Almost Forgot…. The JewelryMonk Podcast Episode 23

In all the excitement of Launching the Latest Video Training Series, I forgot to mention there is a New Episode of The JewelryMonk Podcast.

I talk about:

TheGivingKeys.com  A Company that is doing a Great Job in Paying it Forward

A Jewelry Tip, Using a Soldering Barrier

The Cool Tool of the Week, JewelryMonk’s Jeweler’s Square

A Story about a Time Traveling Man, who gets arrested in Wyoming

INTRODUCING a New Video Course:

(for a very limited time)

 

Have YOU ever been Overwhelmed by all the seemingly complicated processes that go into jewelry making? How to tackle all the concepts used in the craft? How do you get your design or idea from your mind into jewelry….

There’s Fabricating and Soldering – Casting – Model and Mold Making –  Soldering – Stone Setting – Polishing –  just to name a few…… and The List Goes On.

Have YOU ever wanted to take a design that is in your head and create a piece of jewelry from it, one that is repeatable? How much time could you save if you could reproduce one of your handmade designs, over and over, with the same results every time, without recreating the whole piece from scratch?

Are you like me? Do you learn better by examples, rather that books or magazines?

What if someone could show you a Jewelry Creation Method, A Process, A System, ……Step by Step, ….. Every Detail, Every Concept, and WALK WITH YOU THROUGH IT ALL ALONG THE WAY…..

Would that revolutionize your Jewelry Making Experience? If I could Show you how to make your jewelry ideas a reality? Would it open up new opportunities?  Where do you see your Jewelry Making Skills 1 Month from now….1 Year from now?

This Step by Step Fabricating and Soldering Video Course is Focused on:  EDUCATION, EQUIPPING, and ENCOURAGING


These Soldering and Fabrication Video Lessons consist of:

1 Image Sizing Video

3 Videos on Setting Building

1 Video on Metal Assembly

1 Video on Metal Shaping

2 Videos on Metal Trimming

9 Videos on Soldering Techiques

1 Mold Making and Casting Video

1 Video on Stone Setting and Polishing

and plenty of bonus material…….PLENTY! (17 MORE Videos)


I walk you through every process with 4 camera video perspective

I explain exactly what I am doing, the whole time, and why I am doing it.

And in many cases, show you zoomed in photography of the example, so you completely grasp the concept.

I’ll show you how to master, and understand all these concepts and skills, in your own time.

The bottom line is that we’re going to cover a lot of ground together, and you’re going to come out the other end with a complete understanding of the whole Jewelry Creation Method.

SO, If you’re ready to Take your Jewelry Making Skills to the next level, then your next step is clear click the BUY NOW button above and get registered for the Fabricated Pendant Video Course.

You have a big decision to make. I can’t make it for you… the only thing I can do is tell you that this Fabrication and Soldering Video Course works.

I promise:    It is not always going to be easy, change and growth never is

But I also promise:     The opportunity to change is always worth the effort.

Click the BUY NOW button, and I’ll see you in the program…

…… Get Ready to MAKE the BEST Jewelry of Your LIFE…..TOGETHER

Doug

NEW Soldering and Fabrication Video Course NOW AVAILABLE

INTRODUCING a New Video Course:

(for a very limited time)

 

Have YOU ever been Overwhelmed by all the seemingly complicated processes that go into jewelry making? How to tackle all the concepts used in the craft? How do you get your design or idea from your mind into jewelry….

There’s Fabricating and Soldering – Casting – Model and Mold Making –  Soldering – Stone Setting – Polishing –  just to name a few…… and The List Goes On.

Have YOU ever wanted to take a design that is in your head and create a piece of jewelry from it, one that is repeatable? How much time could you save if you could reproduce one of your handmade designs, over and over, with the same results every time, without recreating the whole piece from scratch?

Are you like me? Do you learn better by examples, rather that books or magazines?

What if someone could show you a Jewelry Creation Method, A Process, A System, ……Step by Step, ….. Every Detail, Every Concept, and WALK WITH YOU THROUGH IT ALL ALONG THE WAY…..

Would that revolutionize your Jewelry Making Experience? If I could Show you how to make your jewelry ideas a reality? Would it open up new opportunities?  Where do you see your Jewelry Making Skills 1 Month from now….1 Year from now?

This Step by Step Fabricating and Soldering Video Course is Focused on:  EDUCATION, EQUIPPING, and ENCOURAGING


These Soldering and Fabrication Video Lessons consist of:

1 Image Sizing Video

3 Videos on Setting Building

1 Video on Metal Assembly

1 Video on Metal Shaping

2 Videos on Metal Trimming

9 Videos on Soldering Techiques

1 Mold Making and Casting Video

1 Video on Stone Setting and Polishing

and plenty of bonus material…….PLENTY! (17 MORE Videos)


I walk you through every process with 4 camera video perspective

I explain exactly what I am doing, the whole time, and why I am doing it.

And in many cases, show you zoomed in photography of the example, so you completely grasp the concept.

I’ll show you how to master, and understand all these concepts and skills, in your own time.

The bottom line is that we’re going to cover a lot of ground together, and you’re going to come out the other end with a complete understanding of the whole Jewelry Creation Method.

SO, If you’re ready to Take your Jewelry Making Skills to the next level, then your next step is clear click the BUY NOW button above and get registered for the Fabricated Pendant Video Course.

You have a big decision to make. I can’t make it for you… the only thing I can do is tell you that this Fabrication and Soldering Video Course works.

I promise:    It is not always going to be easy, change and growth never is

But I also promise:     The opportunity to change is always worth the effort.

Click the BUY NOW button, and I’ll see you in the program…

…… Get Ready to MAKE the BEST Jewelry of Your LIFE…..TOGETHER

Doug

4 Prong Setting Tutorial

How to Set a Round Stone in a 4 Prong Setting

I wanted to demonstrate how to set the 2mm stone in a 4 prong setting. In past blog entries I have set stones in shared prong settings, flush settings or gypsy settings, channel settings, bezel settings, and “V” prong settings, but I have never showed how to set the most common of all settings, the basic 4 prong setting in a die struck setting, so kick back, grab a cup of coffee, and enjoy.

Prong Setting Header

I do a little prep work to the head before I begin setting the stone. When I soldered the head into place, there is a little fire scale to the inside of the head. I pre-polished the shank and the outside of the prongs with a 3M Brushes and a Brass Brush in my Foredom. I like to clean up and polish the inside of the setting before the stone is set, for once the stone is set, it is difficult if not impossible to shine the inside of the setting. To polish the inside of the setting, I use a small piece of cotton wrapped around a 0.7mm Tapered Cylinder Bur. A small ball bur will also work. I like to use Natural Cotton, which I usually get out of an aspirin bottle, as opposed to synthetic cotton because it seems to me that the natural cotton holds onto the polishing compound better, but either will work. I spin the cotton onto the bur into a cone shape and add Red Rouge to the “bullet” shaped cotton. I insert this into the inside of the setting and polish.

Prong Setting (1) Prong Setting (2)

Prong Setting (3) Prong Setting (4)

Prong Setting (5) Prong Setting (6)

After the inside is polished, it is time to notch or cut the seats into the prongs. As a rule of thumb, I like to cut the seat about 1/3 the way down the prong, from the top, and cut about 1/3 the way into the prongs. Here, I use a sharp set of dividers to mark the inside of the prong at the same level. I scribe a line as a guide to start cutting. In this instance, the stone I am setting is 2mm, I am using a 1.5mm Hart Setting Bur. The girdle (or side) of this stone is a little thicker than normal, so I cut the seat at an angle to match the stone. When setting stones, always try to match the shape of the girdle with the shape of the cut into the prong.

Prong Setting (7) Prong Setting (8)

Prong Setting (9) Prong Setting (10)

Prong Setting (12) Prong Setting (11)

Next, after you have cut the seats into the prongs, place the stone into the setting and visually check to make sure each prong matches the stone shape and make sure the stone is level. If it is not, adjust the cuts in the prongs at a bit and check again until you are satisfied. Once you are happy with the way the stone sits in the prongs, gently close the prongs with a pair of Needle Nose Pliers to hold the stone in place. Again, check the stone to make sure it is sitting the way you want it to. After you have the prongs closed onto the stone, it is time to tighten the stone. Using the same pliers, gently pull the top of the prong over the stone by placing the pliers at an angle, using the prong on the opposite side to support the pliers and pull the top of the prong down onto the stone. Do this to all 4 prongs, making sure the prongs are “square” or evenly spaced from one another. Check to make sure the stone is tight by grabbing the stone with your Tweezers and seeing if the stone spins.

Prong Setting (13) Prong Setting (14)

Prong Setting (15) Prong Setting (16)

Prong Setting (22)

Once the stone is set and tightened, I like to file the prongs down just a bit to make sure the prongs are even and all the same height. I use a #4 Barrette Needle File to do this. Next I use a small 1.0mm Cup Bur to round and finish the top of the prongs. The prongs measure about 0.6mm in thickness and a 1.0mm cup bur seems to be about the right size. You want to use a cup bur that just fits over the whole prong and does not “ride” on the stone. Make sure you only use this just enough to round the prong and not reduce the size of the prong too much. You want some prong on top of the stone so it won’t wear down too quickly.

Prong Setting (17) Prong Setting (18)

Prong Setting (19) Prong Setting (21)

Prong Setting (20)

Lastly, after the stone is tightened, and the tops of the prongs are finished to your liking, it is time to polish the tops of the prongs. I like to use a Medium Hard Felt Wheel with Red Rouge on it. Again, you do not want to get carried away and polish off the tops of the prongs, but just enough to give them a good shine.

Prong Setting (23) Prong Setting (24)

Prong Setting (25)

I know this stone setting is rather small at 2mm, but the same process will work for any size stones. If you are new to setting stones, I would suggest starting with larger stones to get used to the process.

I hope this helps to explain and simplify the basic 4 prong setting. Mastering this process will go a long way in stepping up your stone setting program and help you to design more pieces with stones, opening up a whole new world and making you more confident in all types of setting.

Thank you as always for stopping by and following along on this journey. I hope you are experimenting with some of the techniques I share. Be sure to sign up to get these tips emailed to you, or send in comments or questions either by commenting here, emailing me at doug@jewelrymonk.com or send me a voicemail. I read and check them all.

Now, get out there and Dazzle the World!

Doug

”The soothing tongue is a tree of life, but a perverse tongue crushes the spirit.”