Day 22 Jewelry Texturing (part 1)

Day 22…. I know, I know, I am a little late posting this one, but I got it under the wire, still on schedule with this crazy 90 in a row kick-off to the JewelryMonk Blog.  I took a road trip this weekend and didn’t have any lessons in the bag, so I had to “whip one up” when I got home, so let’s get on with it.

One of the things I really enjoy about finishing jewelry is trying different contrasting textures. Sometimes just polishing doesn’t “do it” for me.

Texturing (2)

Today and tomorrow I will cover a very quick and very easy way of getting a good texture. The first thing you will need is an Electric Vibratory Engraver. Luckily these are pretty inexpensive and readily available. These come with a carbide steel engraving point, but truthfully, this is the first thing I replace. I have mentioned before that I reuse and retool many of my burs, and this is exactly what I do here. Even though the carbine bit that comes with the engraver is a lot harder, it is a little big to my liking. I make mine sharper and thinner to get into tight spots without marking the walls of the pieces. I just use a small used up ball bur and sharpen it with a Snap-on Disc. The tip can be sharpened, rounded, polished, flattened, etc. to give you different looks, you will have to experiment with this.

Texturing (4) Texturing (5)

Now just turn it on and rub over the area that you want textured. I try to keep the back and forth motion going in the same direction to make the look of the texture uniform. Be careful though since the movement of the engraver is an up and down motion, (like a small jackhammer) and if you touch an area that you do not want textured, it will leave small little divots or pits.

Texturing (6) Texturing (7)

Texturing (9)

Great look if you like contrasting textures and super easy and quick.

Give it a try. Tomorrow I will demonstrate another tip that is amazing in this tool.

Cheers!

Doug

Day 21 Gemstone that take heat and Ultrasonic

Wow. today marks 3 weeks since I started this 90 day-in-a-row Blogging journey, I hope you are following along and having as much fun as I am. I am traveling today, so here is a little quick info for you to take with you:

Gemstone That Can Take Heat

Gemstones that can generally take heat from soldering and casting in place are: Diamond, Ruby, Sapphire, Garnet, Cubic Zirconia and Various lab grown colored gemstones.

Gemstones that can NOT take heat from soldering and casting in place are: Emerald, Opal, Jade, Amethyst, Topaz, Peridot, Coral, Aquamarine, Tourmaline, Topaz, Pearl, Lapis Lazuli, Turquoise and Onyx as these gemstones may burn, crack or discolor when exposed to high heat.

For soldering or casting in place, gemstones should be high quality, dimensions are accurate, free of flaws and inclusions that can turn milky, frosty or crack when heated.

Ultrasonics and Stones

Ultrasonics and Stones

Thanks for stopping by and coming on this journey with me.

Now go have a Great Day!

Doug

Day 21 Gemstone that take heat and Ultrasonic

Wow. today marks 3 weeks since I started this 90 day-in-a-row Blogging journey, I hope you are following along and having as much fun as I am. I am traveling today, so here is a little quick info for you to take with you:

Gemstone That Can Take Heat

Gemstones that can generally take heat from soldering and casting in place are: Diamond, Ruby, Sapphire, Garnet, Cubic Zirconia and Various lab grown colored gemstones.

Gemstones that can NOT take heat from soldering and casting in place are: Emerald, Opal, Jade, Amethyst, Topaz, Peridot, Coral, Aquamarine, Tourmaline, Topaz, Pearl, Lapis Lazuli, Turquoise and Onyx as these gemstones may burn, crack or discolor when exposed to high heat.

For soldering or casting in place, gemstones should be high quality, dimensions are accurate, free of flaws and inclusions that can turn milky, frosty or crack when heated.

Ultrasonics and Stones

Ultrasonics and Stones

Thanks for stopping by and coming on this journey with me.

Now go have a Great Day!

Doug

Day 20 Setting Emeralds and Other Deep Stones

Setting Emeralds and Other Deep Stones

Stone Shape

Hello again and welcome back. Since we spent a few days on the V-Bezel Pendant, I thought I would finish off the week with a couple of articles on stone setting and gemstones in general. Today I will give you a quick demonstration on cutting seats for different shaped stones. When we set the Amethyst in the pendant yesterday, we noticed that the shape of the stone was not like a diamond, but the girdle was thick and the “belly” of the stone was rather “fat”. This is common for colored gemstones and especially common for genuine stones like emeralds, rubies, sapphires, and amethysts. (many others as well). Special care must be taken to cut seats for these stones.

Using a normal 45 degree hart bur will work wonderful for diamonds, cz’s, and other created stones, but the seats in prongs will have to be “tailored” to fit other stones. (The seat is the shape of the cut into the prong or channel wall where the stone will rest)

Here is a couple of images to demonstrate what I am trying to explain.

Seat Cutting1 Seat Cutting2

The first image is not a good fit, the second is what we are aiming for.

I usually start with a 45 Degree Hart Bur to cut the seat, then modify the bottom of the seat with a Ball Bur or a small Cylinder Bur. The seat is cut the same whether it is in a prong, channel wall, bezel, etc. What you are really trying to do is make as much contact area as possible between the stone and the metal, this will protect the stone better, create less pressure points on the stone so it has less chance of breaking, and make the stone tighter.

Quick lesson today, but I hope you find it beneficial.

Have a good day! Now go “Dazzle” the word.

Doug

Day 19 Setting a Bezel Stone

Header Setting

This little “Bezel Pendant” project started a few days ago when I got the bright idea to show how to make a “V-Bezel” after I had the need for one. I thought I would show the process after I got a few comments and questions on application, so I said to myself, “well self, let’s just show how U would use one”.  Today I will show how I finished the setting and finishing on this pendant.

Just as I have used before, I mount the pendant in Dop Wax to secure it during setting. I have some dop wax pre-loaded on different sizes of wooden dowels. I “slightly” heat the surface of the wax, as well as the pendant with my Mini Torch, not too hot or it will sink too deep into the wax. After the pendant is settled in the wax, I press or mold the inside of the wax to make room for the bottom of the stone.

Setting 01 Setting 02 Setting 03

After the piece has set into the wax and is cool enough to handle, I scribe a line with my Dividers, on both the large bezel and the “V” bezel. I mark the line from the base of the setting on both, so the seats I cut will be the same height and the stone will sit level.

Setting 04 Setting 05

Now I carefully cut a “seat” into the bezel. You will want to check out the stone’s girdle and match the shape of the girdle with the cut. In this instance, the Amethyst has a very thick girdle, so I cut the stone seat with a 2.5mm Hart Bur, following the scribed line as best as possible. After the initial cut is made, I shaped the bottom of the seat with a 1.2mm Ball Bur to match the stone as best as I could.

Setting 08 Setting 07

Setting 05 Setting 06

The V-Bezel is cut a bit differently. Since the stone end that is going to be secured is pointed and therefore more fragile, you will want to drill a small hole or divot (not all the way through) into the bezel where the point will be so there is no pressure on that point of the stone. The rest of the seat can be cut with a ball bur, once again trying to match the shape of the stone’s girdle. As you are cutting the seats, you will want to constantly check the stone against the seat, to see how well they match. I hold the stone with a small piece of sticky red wax on the end of an old bur or a nail.

Setting 09 Setting 10

Setting 11

After the seats are cut, place the stone in the setting and press the bezel over the stone carefully with a Flat End Prong Pusher. Slowly push the corners first to secure the stone, then “fold” the rest of the bezel over the stone. Be careful not to add too much pressure and constantly check the stone for tightness.

Setting 12 Setting 13 Setting 14

Now that the stone is set secure, remove the pendant from the Dop Wax by adding as little heat as possible until the wax releases the pendant. Place the pendant in Alcohol to dissolve the wax, in an Ultrasonic Cleaner to speed up the process. Make sure the stone can tolerate the heat, alcohol, and ultrasonic waves beforehand. After the piece is cleaned from the wax, use rubber wheels and polishing wheels to finish the bezels. They look better the flatter you can get them. BE CAREFUL not to touch the stone with the wheels as you are finishing the bezels.

Setting 15 Setting 16 Setting 17

Finally finish polishing the pendant on a polishing wheel with Red Rouge. Clean with an Ultrasonic Cleaner and a Steam Cleaning Machine.

Setting 19 Setting 21

There you have it, an extended lesson on how to make a V-Bezel and how to use it in an application. I hope you enjoyed it and it has opened up some ideas for you. Feel free to comment or share.

By the way, if there are things you would like to see on JewelryMonk, let me know.

Thanks for coming along this journey, now go make something brilliant!

Doug